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Wednesday, April 28, 2010

It's OK to slow down

A varied thrush, black as charred redwood, orange as redwood duff, sits briefly on a fence post. A chipmunk, caught between curiosity and caution considers me, then skittles off to the trees. How will the creatures of this forest cross a wider, faster highway?

I appreciate the well researched letters that have informed us on the Caltrans plan to redesign Richardson Grove. Thank you for the facts and reasoned approaches to balancing our community's economy and quality of life.

I sit in Richardson Grove right now, and from this vantage point I would like to speak for something many of us feel. I would like to speak for love. When I drive to or from Humboldt County, I love driving through this park. I love slowing down, rolling down the windows and feeling the close comfort of the trees: the way they absorb sound, provide shade, forest scents, pattern, color, texture. I roll down the windows and breathe deeply. The passage through this grove, this State Park, is welcome rejuvenation from the freeway part of the journey. I suspect this may be true for many travelers.

Therefore I support saving Richardson Grove from any demolition. It is and will be okay to slow down. It would even be okay to stop for a few minutes in order to preserve this jewel on the journey to and from Humboldt and Del Norte counties.

Cindy Kuttner

Arcata

Monday, April 12, 2010

From "NEC Econews": Trucking Through Redwoods Steers Into Controversy

By Sarah O'Leary

All travelers driving north on Highway 101 know they’ve arrived in a special place when they reach the narrow, curvy section of highway that runs through Richardson Grove State Park and its towering redwoods.

I remember my own first journey to Humboldt, packed into an old Volkswagon van with no air conditioning on a sweltering summer’s day. With windows rolled down, desperate for a breeze, we drove up 101 through the hot valleys and mountain passes. When the road suddenly narrowed and we glimpsed the spreading shade of that first looming redwood it was as if the tree spirits had waved a wand of cooling relief. The shade of the huge trees, coupled with the cathedral-like beauty of the grove took our breath away. We pulled over to gaze up in awe.

No trucks roared by as we stood contemplating the majesty of the redwood forest that so magically crept right up to the side of the highway.

Times have changed in this region since that hot afternoon in the early 1980s, but Richardson Grove still remains a gateway to this unique area – the embodiment of the Redwood Curtain. We are forced to slow our vehicles when we hit those curves just as a visit to our forest and beach trails makes us take a breath and slow down for a few moments.

Now a highway-realignment project proposed by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and backed by some area businesses and community members, threatens to change the character of that passage through Richardson Grove forever.

Rest of article

Thursday, April 8, 2010

Federal Officials Announce Program to Expand Use of America’s Marine Highways

Enews Wednesday, 07 April 2010 12:59

Washington, D.C.--(ENEWSPF)--April 7, 2010. U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood today unveiled a new initiative to move more cargo on the water rather than on crowded U.S. highways. Under the “America’s Marine Highway” program, the Department’s Maritime Administration (MARAD) will help identify rivers and coastal routes that could carry cargo efficiently, bypassing congested roads around busy ports and reducing greenhouse gases.

“For too long, we’ve overlooked the economic and environmental benefits that our waterways and domestic seaports offer as a means of moving freight in this country,” said Secretary LaHood, speaking to transportation professionals at the 7th Annual North American Marine Highways and Logistics Conference in Baltimore, MD. “Moving goods on the water has many advantages: It reduces air pollution. It can help reduce gridlock by getting trucks off our busy surface corridors.”

Rest of Article



Saturday, April 3, 2010

How will the redwood “brand” look when toppled?


To the Editor:

On March 2, Tony Smithers, Executive Director of HC Convention and Visitors Bureau (The Independent, Mar. 9) crowed to Supervisors about our county’s good occupancy and room rates. Tourism industry accounts for 4,770 jobs on the North Coast.

Smithers utilized the recent National Geographic Redwood Report as central to advertising. Not shy about how to “brand” this economic engine of Humboldt, Smithers includes: “Redwoods, redwoods, redwoods, now with 30% less fog.”

Smithers is clear about our greatest asset that draws people and their money to Humboldt. Are the Supervisors blind to our gateway, our #1 icon of Humboldt: Richardson Grove? Does Smithers know it is endangered?

Now in an amazing healthy balance with 101, Richardson Grove will be treated to root-cutting of 40-60 ancient redwoods. Can anyone say what the damage could be? You don’t need all your 10 toes, do you? We can cut off 2 or 3 toes and... you’ll be fine. And when the storm winds blow...

How will our redwood “brand” look when toppled and blocking our “new” widened 101? Will the tourists still come?

Dr. Lauren J. Oliver

Redway

Friday, April 2, 2010

Celebrate Earth Day at Richardson Grove State Park!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 1, 2010

Contact:
(1) Barbara Kennedy, bkenn202@asis.com, 707-946-2248
P.O. Box 29, Weott, CA 95571.

The Save Richardson Grove Coalition is sponsoring an Earth Day event in Richardson Grove State Park on Saturday, April 17 from 10:00 AM until 5:00 PM. The event is free and the public is welcome and encouraged to attend. This will be a no-drug and no-alcohol event. Activities include a Park clean-up, a potluck luncheon, music and guest speakers.

The clean-up of the Park from 10:00 AM-1:00 PM will entail picking up trash at campsites and along trails. Attendees are encouraged to bring work gloves and to carpool. Garbage bags will be provided. Signs will guide you to the picnic area where the clean-up will start.

A potluck luncheon at the picnic area will be held from 1:00 PM-3:00 PM. Attendees are encouraged to bring a dish to share along with their own plate, knife, fork, spoon and mug.

From 3:00 PM-5:00 PM there will be music and speakers discussing environmental issues, particularly the CALTRANS project to widen Highway 101 through Richardson Grove State Park. Speakers will include members of the Intertribal Sinkyone Wilderness Council, members of the Save Richardson Grove Coalition and others to be announced.

Musicians providing acoustic instruments are welcome. Other musical acts are to be announced. Event fliers will be posted. Show your support for the environment and the Park and celebrate springtime by attending.

Thursday, April 1, 2010

Trucking Through Redwoods Steers Into Controversy

By Sarah O'Leary
April/May 2010 Econews


All travelers driving north on Highway 101 know they’ve arrived in a special place when they reach the narrow, curvy section of highway that runs through Richardson Grove State Park and its towering redwoods.

I remember my own first journey to Humboldt, packed into an old Volkswagon van with no air conditioning on a sweltering summer’s day. With windows rolled down, desperate for a breeze, we drove up 101 through the hot valleys and mountain passes. When the road suddenly narrowed and we glimpsed the spreading shade of that first looming redwood it was as if the tree spirits had waved a wand of cooling relief. The shade of the huge trees, coupled with the cathedral-like beauty of the grove took our breath away. We pulled over to gaze up in awe.

No trucks roared by as we stood contemplating the majesty of the redwood forest that so magically crept right up to the side of the highway.

Times have changed in this region since that hot afternoon in the early 1980s, but Richardson Grove still remains a gateway to this unique area – the embodiment of the Redwood Curtain. We are forced to slow our vehicles when we hit those curves just as a visit to our forest and beach trails makes us take a breath and slow down for a few moments.

Now a highway-realignment project proposed by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and backed by some area businesses and community members, threatens to change the character of that passage through Richardson Grove forever.

Original Article